Meaning Over Transformation

This entry is probably ahead of the story, but I wanted to start moving into this subject and I’m not yet organized. It should make more sense later on when I’ve explained such things as the “magical” function M() more thoroughly.

Review: The Magical Function “M()”

As a review for those who may not have seen this function previously on this site, I have invented a mysterious and powerful function over all things used as signs by humans. Named the “M()” function, I can apply it to any symbol or set of symbols of any type and it will return what that symbol represents. I call it the “M() function because it takes something which is a symbol and it returns its meaning (that’s all of its meaning).

How Meaning Carries Over Symbol Transformations

When we move information from one data structure to another, we may or may not use a reversible process. By this I mean that sometimes a transformation is a one-way operation because some of the meaning is lost in the transformation. Sometimes this loss is trivial, but sometimes it is crucial. (Alternatively, there can be transformations which actually add meaning through deductive reasoning and projection. SFAT (story for another time))

Whether a transformation loses information or not, there are some interesting conclusions we can illustrate using my magical, mysterious function M(). Imagine a set β of data structure instances (data) in an anchor state. The full meaning of that data can be expressed as M(β). Now imagine a transformation operation T which maps all of the data in β onto a second set of data Δ.

T : β |–> Δ such that for each symbol σ in β, there is a corresponding symbol δ in Δ that represents the same things, and σ <> δ

By definition, since we have defined T to be an identity function over the meaning of β, then we can conclude that if we apply M() before and after the transformation, we will find ourselves with an equivalence of meaning, as follows:

By definition: T(β) = Δ

Hence: M( T(β) ) ≡ M( Δ )

Also, by definition of T(), then M( β )  ≡ M( T(β) )

Finally, we conclude: M( β ) ≡ M( Δ )

Now, obviously this is a trivial example concocted to show the basic idea of M(). Through the manner by which we have defined our scenario, we get an obvious conclusion. There are many instances where our transformation functions will not produce equivalent sets of symbols. When T() does produce an equivalence, we call it a “loss-less” transformation (borrowing a term from information theory) because no information is lost through its operation.

Another relationship we claim can also be defined in this manner is namely that of semantic equivalence.  This should be obvious as well, from reflection, as I was careful above to refer to “equivalence of meaning”, which is really what I mean when I say two things are semantically equivalent. In this situation, we defined T() as an operation over symbols such that one set of symbols were replaced with a different set of symbols, and the individual pairs of symbols were NOT THE SAME (σ <> δ)! In a most practical sense, what is happening is that we are exchanging one kind of data structure (or sign) with another, such that the two symbols are not syntactically equivalent (they have different signs)  but they remain semantically equivalent. (You can see some of my thoughts on semantic and syntactic equivalence by searching entries tagged and/or categorized “equivalence” and “comparability“.)

A quick example might be a data structure holding a person’s name. Let’s say that within β the name is stored as a string of characters in signature order (first name  middle name  last name) such as “John Everett Doe”. This symbol refers to a person by that name, and so if we apply M() to it, we would recognize the meaning of the symbol to be the thought of that person in our head. Now by applying T() to this symbol, we convert it to a symbol in Δ, also constructed from a string data structure, but this time the name components are listed in phone directory order (last name, first name middle name) such as “Doe, John Everett”. Clearly, while the syntactic presentation of the transformed symbol is completely different, the meaning is exactly the same.

T(“John Everett Doe”) = “Doe, John Everett”

M( T(“John Everett Doe”) ) ≡ M( “Doe, John Everett” )

M( “John Everett Doe” ) ≡ M( T(“John Everett Doe”) )

M( “John Everett Doe” ) ≡ M( “Doe, John Everett” )

“John Everett Doe” <> “Doe, John Everett”

When the transformation is loss less, there is a good chance that it is also reversible, that an inverse transformation T ‘ () can be created. As an inverse transformation, we would expect that T ‘ () will convert symbols in Δ back into symbols in β, and that it will also carry the meaning with complete fidelity back onto the symbols of β. Hence, given this expectation, we can make the following statements about T ‘ ():

T ‘ (Δ) = β

M( T ‘ (Δ) ) ≡ M( β )

By definition of T ‘ (), then M( Δ )  ≡ M( T ‘ (Δ) )

And again: M( Δ ) ≡ M( β )

Extending our example a moment, if we apply T ‘ () to our symbol, “Doe, John Everett”, we will get our original symbol “John Everett Doe”.

Meaning Over “Lossy” Transformation

So what happens when our transformation is not loss-less over meaning? Let’s imagine another transformation which transforms all of the symbols σ in β into symbols ε in Ε. Again, we’ll say that σ <> ε, but we’ll also define T ‘ ‘ () as “lossy over meaning” – which just indicates that as the symbols are transformed, some of the meaning of the original symbol is lost in translation. In our evolving notation, this would be stated as follows:

T ‘ ‘ (β) = Ε

M( T ‘ ‘ (β) ) ≡ M( Ε )

However, by the definition of T ‘ ‘ (), then M( β )  !≡ M( T ‘ ‘ (β) )

Therefore: M( β ) !≡ M( Ε )

In this case, while every symbol in β generates a symbol in Ε, the total information content of Ε is less than that in B. Hence, the symbols of the two sets are no longer semantically equivalent. With transformations such as this, the likelihood that there is an inverse transformation that could restore β from Ε becomes more unlikely. Logically, it would seem there could be no circumstances where β could be reconstituted from Ε alone, since otherwise the information would have been carried completely across the transformation. I don’t outright make this conclusion, however, since it depends on the nature of the information lost.

An example of a reversible, lossy transformation would include the substitution of a primary key value for an entire row of other data which in itself does not carry all of the information for which it is a key, but which can be used in an index fashion to recall the full set of data. For example, if we created a key value symbol consisting of a person’s social security number and last name, we could use that as a reference for that person. This reference symbol could be passed as a marker to another context (from β to Ε, say) where it could be interpreted only partially as a reference to a person. But which person and what other attributes are known about that person in the new context Ε if we define the transformation in such a way that all of the symbols for these other attributes stay in β? Not much, making this transformation one where information is “lost” in Ε.  However, due to its construction from β, the key symbol could still be used on the inverse transformation back to β to reconstitute the missing information (presuming β retains it).

An example of a one-way transformation might be one that drops the middle name and last name components from a string containing a name. Hence, T ‘ ‘ ( “John Everett Doe” ) might be defined to result in a new symbol, “John”. Since many other symbols could map to the same target, creating an inverse transformation without using other information becomes impossible.

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Functions On Symbols

Data integration is a complex problem with many facets. From a semiotic point of view, quite a lot of human cognitive and communicative processing capabilities is involved in the resolution. This post is entering the discussion at a point where a number of necessary terms and concepts have not yet been described on this site. Stay tuned, as I will begin to flesh out these related ideas.

You may also find one of my permanent pages on functions to be helpful.

A Symbol Is Constructed

Recall that we are building tautologies showing equivalence of symbols. Recall that symbols are made up of both signs and concepts.

If we consider a symbol as an OBJECT, we can diagram it using a Unified Modeling Language (UML) notation. Here is a UML Class diagram of the “Symbol” class.

UML Diagram of the "Symbol" Object

UML Diagram of the "Symbol" Object

The figure above depicts how a symbol is constructed from both a set of “signs” and a set of “concepts“. The sign is the arrangement of physical properties and/or objects following an “encoding paradigm” defined by the members of a context. The “concept” is really the meaning which that same set of people (context) has projected onto the symbol. When meaning is projected onto a physical sign, then a symbol is constructed.

Functions Impact Both Structure and Meaning

Symbols within running software are constructed from physical arrangements of electronic components and the electrical and magnetic (and optical) properties of physical matter at various locations (this will be explained in more depth later). The particular arrangement and convention of construction of the sign portion of the symbol defines the syntactic media of the symbol.

Within a context, especially within the software used by that context, the same concept may be projected onto many different symbols of different physical media. To understand what happens, let’s follow an example. Let’s begin with a computer user who wants to create a symbol within a particular piece of software.

Using a mechanical device, the human user selects a button representing the desired symbol and presses it. This event is recognized by the device which generates the new instance of the symbol using its own syntactic medium, which is the pulse of current on a closed electrical circuit on a particular wire. When the symbol is placed in long term storage, it may appear as a particular arrangement of microscopic magnetic fields of various polarities in a particular location on a semi-metalic substrate. When the symbol is in the computer’s memory, it may appear as a set of voltages on various microscopic wires. Finally, when the symbol is projected onto the computer monitor for human presentation, it forms a pattern of phosphoresence against a contrasting background allowing the user to perceive it visually.

Note through all of the last paragraph, I did not mention anything about what the symbol means! The question arises, in this sequence of events, how does the meaning of the symbol get carried from the human, through all of the various physical representations within the computer, and then back out to the human again?

First of all, let’s be clear, that at any particular moment, the symbol that the human user wanted to create through his actions actually becomes several symbols – one symbol for each different syntactic representation (syntactic media) required for it to exist in each of the environments described. Some of these symbols have very short lives, while others have longer lives.

So the meaning projected onto the computer’s keyboard by the human:

  • becomes a symbol in the keyboard,
  • is then transformed into a different symbol in the running hardware and operating system,
  • is transformed into a symbol for storage on the computer’s hard drive, and
  • is also transformed into an image which the human perceives as the shape of the symbol he selected on the keyboard.

But the symbol is not actually “transforming” in the computer, at least in the conventional notion of a thing changing morphology. Instead, the primary operation of the computer is to create a series of new symbols in each of the required syntactic media described, and to discard each of the old symbols in turn.

It does this trick by applying various “functions” to the symbols. These functions may affect both the structure (syntactic media) of the symbol, but possibly also the meaning itself. Most of the time, as the symbol is copied and transferred from one form to another, the meaning does not change. Most of the functions built into the hardware making up the “human-computer interface” (HCI) are “identity” functions, transferring the originally projected concept from one syntactic media form to another. If this were not so, if the symbol printed on the key I press is not the symbol I see on the screen after the computer has “transformed” it from keyboard to wire to hard drive to wire to monitor screen, then I would expect that the computer was broken or faulty, and I would cease to use it.

Sometimes, it is necessary/desirable that the computer apply a function (or a set of functions called a “derivation“) which actually alters the meaning of one symbol (concept), creating a new symbol with a different meaning (and possibly a different structure, too).

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