Software as Semantic Choice

When I design a new software system, I have to choose what parts of reality matter enough to capture in the data (data is little bits of information stored symbollically and in great repetitive quantities). I can’t capture the entirety of reality symbollically, software is another example in life of having to divide an analog reality into discrete named chunks, choosing some and leaving others unmentioned.

This immediately sets the system up for future “failure” because at some point, other aspects of the same reality will become important. This is what in artificial intelligence is called “brittleness”. A quality which bedeviled the expert system movement and kept it from becoming a mainstream phenomenon. This is also a built in constraint on semantic web work, but I’ll leave that for another post.

Taking the example of quantum physics research as an example, there’d be no point in writing one application to capture both the speed and position of a quantum particle in a database, because as we all know, only one or the other data points is available to us to measure at one time. Thus we choose to capture the one that’s important to our study, and we ignore the other.

This is why a picture is worth a thousand words: because it is an analog of reality and captures details that can remain unnamed until needed at a future time.

This is also why we say that in communication we must “negotiate reality”. We must agree together (software developer and software user) what parts of reality matter, and how those parts are named, recognized, and interact.

In reading a recent thread on Library Science, it sounds like in the “indexing and abstracting” problem (used to set up a searchable space for finding relevant documents), a choice has to be made on what we think the searcher will most likely bring with him in order to find the information they seek. But by virtue of making one choice, we necessarily eliminate other choices we might have made which may have supported other seekers better.

This is an interesting parallel, and I must assume that I’ll find more as this dialog continues.

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