Context and Chomsky’s Colorless Green Ideas

Language is code. The speaker chooses the terms, sequence and intonations of their speech with the hope that the listener shares enough of the same human experience to recognize the intended meaning. Conversation is a negotiation as much as anything else. In conversation, the participants can adjust the selection of terms and details until they all reach an understanding of what is being said. This is the practical meaning of “context”, then.

Many years ago, in an effort to make a point about how syntax is different from semantics, Noam Chomsky once proposed the following sentence as an example of a grammatically correct sentence that had no discernible meaning:

Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

In the context within which Chomsky was writing this sentence, reflective of common cultural experience of these terms among a broad community of American society, he made the claim that the sentence had no meaning. Since that time, other scholars have suggested that there may be contexts in which this construction of terms may actually be meaningful.

Here’s a quote from the english language version of Wikipedia from August 1, 2005:

This phrase can have legitimate meaning to English-Spanish bilinguals, for whom there are double-entendres about the word “green” (meaning “newly-formed”) and “sleep” (used as a verb of non-experience). An equivalent sentence [in the context understood by these English-Spanish bilinguals] would be “Newly formed, bland ideas are unexpressible in an infuriating way.”

This little example provides an excellent case study of the role context plays in communication. Never mind the fact that the sentence was first defined in a context for which it held no meaning. Since the moment of its invention, other contexts have either been recognized or constructed around the sentence in which it holds meaning.

The notion of “context” as that mileiu which drives the interpretation of a sentence such as this is the same notion that explains how the meaning of any coded message must be interpretted. This would include messages encoded in the data structures of computer systems. Data within a omputer system is constructed within and in order to support specific information recordation and transmittal of things important to a specific context. This context is the tacit agreement between the software developers and the business community on what the “typical interpretation” of those computer symbols should be.

The importance of context to the understanding of the data integration problem cannot be understated (which is why I keep coming back to it on this blog). While many theorists recognize the role context plays, and many pundits have written about the failures of computer systems when context has been ignored or mishandled, practitioners continue to develop and deploy applications with little explicit attention to context.

All computer applications written in business today are written from some point of view. This point of view establishes the context of the system. Most developers would agree with these statements. The trick is to define a system which allows the context of the system to change and evolve over time, as the business community learns and invents it. It must be a balancing act between excluding the software equivalent of Chomsky’s meaningless statement, and allowing the software to adapt as the context shifts to allow real meaning to be applied to those structures.

Example of How Meaning Is Attached to Structure

What follows is a detailed example of the thought process followed by a software developer to create a class of data structures and how meaning is attached to those structures.

Consider that the meaning of one data structure may be composed of the collection of meanings of a set of smaller structures which themselves have meaning. Take the following description as the meaning to be represented by a structure:

An employee is a human being or person. Each employee has a unique identity of their own. Each employee has a name, which may be the same as the name of a different person or employee. Being human, each employee has an age, calculated by counting the number of years since they were born up to some other point in time (such as present day).Each person of a certain age may enter into a marriage with another human being, who in turn also has their own identity and other attributes of a person.

To represent this information using data structures (i.e., to project the meaning of this information onto a data structure), we might tie the various concepts about a human being/employee to a computer-based data structure. Recognizing that a human being is an object with many additional characteristics of which we might want to know about, we might choose to project the concept of “human beings” or “people” onto a relational table and the concept of a particular individual onto one of that table’s rows (or a similar record structure).

This table would represent a set of individual human beings, and onto each row of the table would be projected the meaning of a particular human being. Saying this again in a more conventional manner, we would say that each row of the table will reference a singular and particular human being, the all of the rows will represent the set of all human beings we’ve observed in the context of our usage of the computer system.

In a more mathematical vein, we would define a projection Þ from the set of actual human beings Α onto Š, (Þ(Α) |–> Š), the set of data structures such that for any α in Α where α is a human being, there is a record or row σ in Š that represents that human being.

A record data structure being a conglomeration of fields, each of which can symbolically represent some attribute of a larger whole, then we might project additional attributes of the human being, such as their name and identifier, to particular fields within the record. If σ is the particular record structure representing a particular human being, α, then the meaning (values) of the attributes of that person could be associated with the fields, f1..fn, of that record through attribute-level projections, ψ1..ψn for attributes 1 .. n.

To represent a particular person, first we would project the reference to the person to a particular row, Þ(α) |–> σ, then we would also project the attribute facts about that person onto the individual fields of that row:

ψ1(α.1) |–> σ.f1

ψn(α.n) |–> σ.fn

Projection onto Relational Structure

When modeling a domain for incorporation into computer software, the modeler’s task is to define a set of structures which software can be written to manipulate. When that software is to use relational database management systems, then the modeler will first project the domain concepts onto abstract relational structures defined over “tuples”. These abstract structures have a well-defined mathematical nature which if followed provides very powerful manipulations. The developer projects meaning onto relations in a conventional way, such as by defining a relation of attributes to represent “PERSON” – or the set of persons, and another relation of attributes to represent “EMPLOYEE” – or the set of persons who are also employees. Having defined these relational sets, the relational algebra permits various mathematical operations/functions to be applied, such as “JOIN” and “INTERSECTION”. These functions have strictly defined properties and well-defined results over arbitrary tuples. The software developer having projected meaning onto the individual relations, he is also therefore able to project meaning on the outcomes of these operations which can then be used to manipulate large sets of data in an efficient, and semantically correct way.

As the developer creates the software however, they must keep in mind what these functions are doing on two levels, at the level of the set content and at the level of the represented domain (the referent of the sets and manipulations). Thus the intersection of the PERSON and EMPLOYEE relations should produce the subset of tuples (records, etc.) which has its own meaning derived from the initial projected meaning of the original sets. Namely, this intersection represents the set of PERSONS who are also EMPLOYEES, (which is the same, alternatively, as the set of EMPLOYEES who are also PERSONS). This is an important point about software: the meaning is not simply recorded in the data structure but the manipulations of the data by the computer themselves have specific connotations and implications on the meaning of data as it is processed.

Representational Redundancy

As a typical practice in the projection of information onto data structures within the relational model, there will usually be a repetition of the information projected onto more than one symbol. In particular, the reference to the identity of a single person will be represented both by the mere existence of a single row in the table, and also by a subset of fields on the row which the software developers have chosen (and which the software enforces) for this purpose. In other words, under common software development practices, each record/row as a conglomerate entity will represent a single person. In addition, there will be k attributes (1 <= k <= n) on that record structure whose values in combination also represent that same individual. These k attributes make up the “primary key” of the data structure. The software developer will use and repeat these columns on multiple data structures to permit additional concepts regarding the relationship between that person and other ideas also being recorded. For example, a copy of one person record’s primary key could be placed on another person record and be labelled “spouse”. The attributes which make up the primary key often have less mechanical meanings as well (for example, perhaps the primary key for our person includes the name attribute. As part of the primary key, the name value of the person merely helps to reference that person. It also in its own right represents the name of the person.

How Meaning Attaches to Data Structures: A Summary

What follows is a high level summary of how humans attach meaning to various kinds of data structures within a computer. It will serve as a good baseline account, though certainly not an exhaustive one, providing a model upon which more detailed dicussion can begin. 

 Background Terminology

Computer systems provide functionality to support the performance and record of business processes. They do that through three inter-related features: DATA, LOGIC, and PRESENTATION. The presentation consists of information displays permitting both an information visualization aspect and an information capture aspect. The logic consists of several aspects, much of it having to do with support of the presentation and manipulation of displays, but also a lot of it having to do with creation, transformation and storage of data. Data consists of sets of symbols constructed in a systematic, regular fashion using a set of data structures. Different data structures are constructed to represent different aspects of the recorded activity. It is in the relationships between the macro and micro structures where the specific detailed information captured.generated by the business process resides. By following a codified, rigid construction of its data structures, the computer system is able to record multiple recurring instances of similar events. Through the development of fixed transformations using program logic, the computer system is able to make routine, conventional conclusions about those events or observations, and it is able to maintain and retain those observations virtually indefinitely.
Data is maintained and stored in DATA STRUCTURES. The more regular these data structures are, the more easily they are interpreted by a broad audience of software developers. In most situations, the PRESENTATION of the data captured by a system to the end user of that system is in a more directly understandable form than the way that information is stored in the computer.  (This statement is not only trivially true, but in a very deep sense too, since the computer actually stores everything using more and more complex sequences of binary digits. That’s a different subject than our current presentation.)  The data structures within the computer system typically exist in two, simultaneous forms, one intended to support human reasoning (through what is often called a “logical”, “abstract” or “conceptual” model) and one supporting manipulations by the computer. Most software developers today strictly deal with the abstract model of the data for design, coding, and discussion. (There are still some developers working in assembly level code, but even that is at a more abstract level than the actual electro-mechanical machinations of the actual hardware!)
An obvious observation, at least on its face, is that different computer systems will store data representing similar ideas using different structures. We need to keep this in the back of our minds as we progress through the rest of this discussion, but it will be more directly adressed in other entries.
 A final thought concerns sets of data of similar structure, called a POPULATION. A population of data consists of some set of data symbols, all constructed using the same data structure pattern which represents a set of similar ideas. The classification of populations of data structures applies to the DATA portion of systems, represents an analogous classification of sets of observed events external to the computer system, and is affected by and affecting the LOGIC and PRESENTATION portions of the computer system. A more detailed definition of the notion of a “population” will also be treated in separate sections.

Commonalities of Structure

Many computer systems, especially those built in support of business (or other human activity) processes, are constructed using a conventional system of abstract data structures. (When I say they are “conventional” what I mean is that the majority of software developers follow conventional patterns for the construction of data structures to represent their idiosynchratic subject areas.) Whether these structures are called “objects”, “tables”, “records”, or something else, they typically take the form of a heterogenous collection of smaller structures grouped together into regular conglomerations. Instances or examples of the larger collections of data structures will each be said to “represent” individual intances of some real-world conglomerate. Each of the individual component element structures of these conglomerations will each be said to represent the individual attributes or characteristics of the real-world conglomerate object. In order to permit efficient processing by the computer,   instances of similar phenomenon will be represented by the same kind of conglomeration.
Typically, business systems will be based on a data structure called a RECORD.  Records consist of a series of “attribute data structures” all related in some fashion to each other. (A more complex structure called an “object” still has record-like attributes combined together to represent a larger whole, the nuances and variation of object-based representation is a subject for later.)  Each RECORD will stereotypically symbolize one instance of a particular concept. This could be a reference to and certain observed details of a real-world object, or it could be something more ephemereal like observations of an event. For example, one “PERSON” record would represent a single individual person.
RECORDS themselves consist of individually defined data elements or FIELDS. Each RECORD of a particular type will share the same set of FIELDS. Each FIELD will symbolize one kind of fact about the thing symbolized by the RECORD. For example, a NAME field on a PERSON record will record what the represented individual’s name is, at least as it was at the time the record was created. 
The set of all records within a system having the same structure will typically be collected and stored together, often in a data structure called a TABLE. Each TABLE will symbolize the set of KNOWN INSTANCES of whatever type of thing each record represents. TABLES are also described as having ROWS and COLUMNS. Each row of a table is one RECORD. The set of shared element-attribute structures across the set of  rows can be described as the “columns” of the table. Each column represents the set of all instances of a FIELD in the table, in other words, the same field across all records. Tables are a commonly used data structure because they readily support interpretation using relational algebra and set theoretic operations, as well as being easily presented and understood both by human and computer.  

Basic Data Structures and Their Relationships

The nomenclature of “record”, ” table”, “row”, “column” and “fields” describes the construction building blocks of an abstract syntactic medium whose usage permits humans to represent complex concepts within the computer system. By assigning names to various collections and combinations of these generic structures, humans project meaning onto them. Using diagrams called “data models”, a short hand of sorts allows the modeler to describe how the generic tables and fields relate to each other and what these relationships signify in the external world. These models also, by virtue of the typified short hand they use, allows for the generation of computer logic that can be applied to a database to support certain standard operations and manipulations of the data generated by a computer system.

Traditional data modeling results in the creation of a data dictionary which relates each structural element to a particular kind of concept. Every structure will be given a name, and if the developers are diligent, these can be associated with more fully realized text descriptions as well. Some aspects of the data structures are not described, at least typically, within a data model, such as populations or subsets of records with similar structures.

Traditional data dictionary entries record name and description of the set of all structures contained in a table. Using a set of structures to represent a set or collection of similar objects is itself a symbolic action. So not only does each row in a table represent one instance of some type of thing, and each column represents one observed (or derived) fact or attribute of that instance, but the collection of all instances of these row data structures also represents the logical set or population of these things.

The strategy for applying meaning to these data structures begins when the decision is made to treat the entirety of each record as the representation of a member of a population of like things. Being similar, then, a set of fields is conceived to capture various detailed observations regarding the things. These fields are intended to capture details about both how each thing is different from the other things in the collection, but also how different things may share similarities. Much of the business logic of the application system will be consumed by the comparisons between individual things, and the mathematical derived counts (and other metrics) of those sets of things (and of subsets within). Using the computer to compare the bit sequences contained in each field, the computer will indicate whether these contents are the same or different between different instances. Humans will then interpret the results of these comparisons by projecting the conclusion out of the computer and into the conceptual world.

For example, let’s say that we have defined the computer sequence “10101010” to represent a reference to a specific person, “Julie Smith”. If we take two different instances of bit sequences and compare them in the computer, the computer will tell us if they are the same or not. As humans, we would then interpret the purely electro-mechanical result which the computer calculated that “10101010” and “10101010” are the same as an indication that the two instances of these sequences represent the same specific person. Likewise, we would interpret a computer result indicating that two bit sequences were not the same as an indication that different people were being referred to.  This type of projection of meaning from mechanical result to logical inference is fundamental to the way humans use computers.

The specific number of fields and their bit sequence representations (data types)  that are developed within a computer application is entirely dependent on the complexity of the problem domain and the attributes of the objects required to reason over that domain. However, no matter how simple or complex, it is the projection of meaning onto the representation of these attributes in the computer and the projection of an interpretation onto the results of the computer comparisons of the physical representations which makes the computer the powerful engine that it is in our society.

How Row Subsets Represent Subpopulations
How Row Subsets Represent Subpopulations

 

The Syntactics of Speech: What a Language Permits You to Say Is Less Than What You Know

I found this article intensely interesting. It corroborates and validates some of my own ideas about how language and symbols are used in communication. Namely, it suggests that even though a language does not contain structures and syntactic rules allowing for precise designation of a concept, that does not mean that such a concept cannot be communicated and understood by someone who uses that language. It just may take a lot more time to convey the thought. It may also be difficult to confirm the listener’s understanding because the language they have available to respond is the same one as the original message (which we said could not directly convey the meaning).

NY Times article

Example Interaction Between Parent and Child Context

In a previous post, I described in general some of the relationships that could exist between and across a large organization’s sub-contexts. What follows is a short description of some actual observations of how the need for regional autonomy in the examination and collection of taxes affected the use of software data structures at the IRS.

Effect of Context on Systems and Integration Projects

July 15, 2005

Contexts lay claim to individual elements of a syntactic medium. A data structure (syntactic medium) used in more than one context by definition must contain meaningful symbols for each context. Some substructures of the data structure may be purposefully “reserved” for local definition by child contexts. In the larger, shared context, these data structures may have no meaning (see the idea of “traveller” symbols). When used by a child context, the meaning may be idiosyncratic and opaque to the broader context.

One way this might occur is through the agreement across different organizational groups that a certain structure be set aside for such uses. Two examples would include the automated systems at the IRS used respectively for tax examinations and tax collections.

Within the broad context defined by the practitioners of “Tax Examination” which the examination application supports, several child contexts have been purposefully developed corresponding to “regions” of the country. Similar organizational structure have also been defined for “Tax Collection” which the collection application supports. In both systems, portions of the syntactic media have been set aside with the express purpose of allowing the regional contexts to project additional, local meaning into the systems.

While all regions are contained in the larger “Examination” or “Collection” contexts, it was recognized that the sheer size of the respective activities was too great for the IRS central offices to be able to control and react to events on the ground in sufficient time. Hence, recognizing that the smaller regional authorities were in better position to diagnose and adjust their practices, the central authorities each ceded some control. What this allowed was that the regional centers could define customized codes to help them track these local issues, and that each application system would capture and store these local codes without disrupting the overall corporate effort.

Relying on the context defined and controlled by the central authorities would not be practical, and could even stifle innovation in the field. This led directly to the evolution of regional contexts. 

Even though each region shares the same application, and that 80 to 90% – even 95% – of the time, uses it in the same way, each region was permitted to set some of its own business rules. In support of these regional differences in practice, portions of the syntactic medium presented by each of the applications were defined as reserved for use by each region. Often this type of approach would be limited to classification elements or other informational symbols, as opposed to functional markers that would effect the operation of the application.

This strategy permits the activities across the regions to be rolled up into the larger context nearly seamlessly. If each region had been permitted to modify the functionality of the system, the ability to integrate would be quickly eroded, causing the regions to diverge and the regional contexts to share less and less with time. Eventually, such divergence could lead to the need for new bridging contexts, or in the worst case into the collapse of the unified activity of the broader context.

By permitting some regional variation in the meaning and usage of portions of the application systems, the IRS actually strengthened the overall viability of these applications, and mitigated the risk of cultural (and application system) divergence.

What a Context Is: Information Flow Theory

I’ve been busy lately, and let this discussion lapse for a bit. Let’s see if I can kickstart it again.

Sometimes, information flows from the physical world to a person who observes and interprets his perceptions to create and recognize new knowledge. Sometimes, someone creates a message in a physical medium and “sends” it into the world hoping that there will be another person who not only can sense it, but can recognize it as a message and can receive the information layered on top of the physical perception. The first is an example of simple observation and perception, the second is an example of communication within a context. While both rely on the perception of physical reality by the observer, they are fundamentally, though subtlety, different.

I have been reading a book on the mathematical theory underlying the “flow” of “information” in the real world, and while I don’t yet really understand the theory, there are some points the book is failing to make about context which I think are important.

Barwise, Jon and Seligman, Jerry, Information Flow: The Logic of Distributed Systems, Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Not that the book was intended to cover the concept of context, per se, being an attempt to lay out a mathematical/logical framework for describing the flow of information across, through and between physical systems. It does have an extensive section on “local logics” which when I understand it better may help me describe my own ideas about context in a formal manner.

What struck me, and forms the origin point of today’s discussion on contexts, is the example the authors use to introduce and illustrate the technical discussion. And as you will see, it is not just the example given, but variations of it that I will use to elucidate better what a context is and is not. To get to the meat of my thinking, here is their example, as written on pages 4-5.

Judith, a keen but inexperienced mountaineer, embarked on an ascent of Mt. Ateb. She took with her a compass, a flashlight, a topographic map, and a bar of Lindt bittersweet chocolate. The map was made ten years previously, but she judged that the mountain would not have changed too much. Reaching the peak shortly after 2 P. M. she paused to eat two squares of chocolate and reflect on the majesty of her surroundings.

At 2:10 P. M. she set about the descent. Encouraged by the ease of the day’s climb, she decided to take a different route down. It was clearly indicated on the map and clearly marked on the upper slopes, but as she descended the helpful little piles of stones left by previous hikers petered out. Before long she found herself struggling to make sense of compass bearings taken from ambiguously positioned rocky outcrops and the haphazard tree line below. By 4 P. M. Judith was hopelessly lost.

Scrambling down a scree slope, motivated only by the thought that down was a better bet than up, the loose stones betrayed her, and she tumbled a hundred feet before breaking her fall against a hardy uplands thorn. Clinging to the bush and wincing atthe pain in her left leg, she took stock. It would soon be dark. Above her lay the treacherous scree, below her were perils as yet unknown. She ate the rest of the chocolate.

Suddenly, she remembered the flashlight. It was still working. She began to flash out into the twilight. By a miracle, her signal was seen by another day hiker, who was already near the foot of the mountain. Miranda quickly recognized the dots and dashes of the SOS and hurried on to her car where she phoned Mountain Rescue. Only twenty minutes later the searchlight from a helicopter scanned the precipitous east face of Mt. Ateb, illuminating the frightened Judith, still clinging to the thorn bush but now waving joyously at the aircraft.

Was Judith Lucky That Miranda Knew Morse Code?

In a word, yes. In so many ways:

  • like the fact that Miranda was near the bottom of the mountain,
  • that she had a clear view of the side of the mountain where Judith lay,
  • that she had a cell phone at the car,
  • and most importantly, Judith was indeed lucky that Miranda knew the Morse code for “SOS”.

In fact, it was also lucky that Judith herself knew the code. So in the story as given, since Judith knew the code to use when she found herself in trouble, she used her light as the syntactic medium in which she encoded a message of her need for help. The fact that Morse code is a globally standard coding scheme simply meant that both Judith and Miranda both shared a common context without ever having met. The fact of their shared knowledge of the code provided the context by which Judith was able to get her message to Miranda.

What if Miranda Didn’t Know Morse Code

Things could have been much worse for Judith if either of them had no knowledge of the code, or if neither of them did. In addition, it was lucky that Miranda was somehow aware (or realized as she was watching) that a flashing light could be used to signify such a code, and that she then obviously deduced from the repeated pattern that someone was sending a message.

Imagine what might have happened if Miranda had seen the flashing light, but didn’t recognize it as a code, and therefore didn’t try to translate what she was seeing. Instead of reacting by calling for help, she might have thought to herself “Oh look, there’s a light up on the mountain. I wonder what that is?” but then gone on about her business.

In other words, Miranda could have observed her environment and perceived the flashing light but concluded that it was simply a physical phenomenon of no particular import. She may have perceived the signal but failed to recognize it as a message. In which case, this would show that Judith and Miranda had failed to establish a context for the communication.

What if Judith didn’t know Morse Code?

If Judith didn’t know Morse Code, perhaps she would still have started waving her flashlight around. Miranda having seen the light would have no reason to recognize a code.

Would this mean Judith would be out of luck? Not necessarily, if Miranda was also an experienced hiker. Miranda being in the context of hiking, it might occur to her that there shouldn’t be a light on that part of the mountain at that moment in time. She might think to herself that the random way the light was moving, plus its position on the mountain compared with where the safe trails were, added up to someone in distress.

In this case, a message has still been sent from Judith to Miranda, with the same result. The context that Miranda was thinking in plus her perception and prior knowledge of the mountain trails, allowed her to reach a conclusion that there was someone on the mountain in trouble. But it is important to note that Judith was not in the same context as Miranda.

In fact, if Miranda was a ranger, she may have been trained to look for and recognize the behavior of people in distress. In this example, we must conclude that Judith was not actually participating in the context with Miranda. It was Miranda’s knowledge of and mindset regarding her perceptions of the dangerous mountain environment which led her to deduce the existence of a person in trouble, not the fact of Judith’s trying to send a message.

Yes, this Judith tried to send a message, but she couldn’t have known that her random wavings would be recognized in anyway. Whereas the Judith who used Morse code actually knew of a context and encoded a very specific message using that context, with the expectation and hope that someone else might also understand it.

The difference in the two versions of the story is subtle. In both cases a message was sent, and in both a message was received and an action was taken. But in the first story, a bridging context in the form of Morse Code was called upon to carry a very specific message, while in the second story there was no bridging context. In the second story, it was entirely the perceptiveness and deductive power of Miranda’s “hiking Mt. Ateb context” which allowed her to create for herself new information: namely that “someone out there is in trouble”.

Once More, What If Judith Wasn’t In Trouble?

Let’s take one more variation of the story to enforce this last point. Let’s say that everything happened as described, except that instead of falling down the scree, Judith purposefully rappelled down the side of the mountain. And furthermore, that instead of clinging desperately to a thorn bush, that she had actually managed to establish a bivuoac in that peculiar outpost. In this version of the story, perhaps Judith is waving her flashlight around as in our second story, only this time merely to light her little campground while fixing herself dinner.

Now imagine ranger Miranda, trained as before and with a knowledge of the trails, but without prior knowledge of anyone camping where Judith found her perch. Using her same described skills of perception and deduction, Miranda may still come to the conclusion that there was someone on the side of the mountain in trouble, and would take the aforementioned steps to effect a rescue. Only she would find that Judith was not in need of help, and is now put out by the disturbance of her relaxation by the whirring chopper blades.

In this version of the story, Miranda is still in the same context as before, and uses her perceptions and the rules of that context to reach her conclusion. The fact is, and this second version of the story should make it clear, that while information did flow from Judith to Miranda just as before, we cannot call this information a “message” carried on a medium and in a context shared by Judith and Miranda. In other words, it was not a purposeful communication across a bridging context.

No, quite simply, in both of these latter examples, Miranda’s context guided her to her perception and the creation of the knowledge that Judith was on the mountain and in trouble (even if she was mistaken on this last point in the final story).

Summary

The fact that a person who presses a flashlight button does or does not intend to send a message – to communicate through that act -defines whether we classify the information flow as being a symbollic act or not. Perhaps the person does not realize or care whether there is another person watching for a flashlight in the dark. The factthat someone sees the light and acts in response does not mean that communication has occurred. Just because information has flowed does not mean that symbols have flowed.
This is a subtle distinction but an important one.

Why Comparability Is Critical To Solving The Data Integration Problem

At its most basic, the task of data integration from multiple source systems is one of recognizing the EQUIVALENCY and diagnosing the CONFLICTS among sets of symbols (the data) stored in each system’s data structures (syntactic media). Data integration is accomplished when the conflicts have been eliminated through TRANSFORMATION into new COMMON SYMBOLS which are COMPARABLE at both the syntactic and semantic levels.

The end result of data integration should be that SEMANTICALLY EQUIVALENT (or at least COMPARABLE) data structures become SYNTACTICALLY EQUIVALENT (COMPARABLE) as well. When this result is achieved, the data structures are considered COMPARABLY EQUIVALENT, and the data from the different source systems can be collapsed, combined or integrated correctly.

Structural Comparability

The issue can be characterized as one of the COMPARABILITY of data between systems.

  • Syntactic Comparability is defined by the DATA TYPE and internal DATA STRUCTURE
  • Semantic Comparability is defined by the CONCEPT or MEANING projected onto the data structure by the users of the source system
  • Two data items are COMPARABLE if they share both SYNTACTIC and SEMANTIC COMPARABILITY

Typical Conflicts

Typical conflicts occur between and among the data structures originating from different sources.

  • Syntactic Conflicts:
    • Data Type Conflicts
    • Structural Conflicts
    • Key Conflicts
  • Semantic Conflicts:
    • Scale Conflicts
    • Abstraction/Formula Conflicts
    • Domain Conflicts
  • Symbol Conflicts:
    • Naming Conflicts (Synonyms, Homonyms, Antonyms)

Syntactic Conflicts

  • Data Type Conflicts – The same concept projected onto different physical representations. Example: different codes for the same set of options
  • Structural Conflicts – For example, the same concept (referent) represented in one database by only a single attribute in one data source, but as a complete record of attributes in another source.
  • Key Conflicts – Two systems using different unique keys for the same concept.
    • As an example, from a freight rail project I once worked, one set of systems represented a “station” by using the nearest Mileboard number to the station, while another set used an industry standard designator called a “SPLC” which was a code assigned to every reported station on all rail lines in North America.
    • In this example, the two different keys conflicted syntactically (e.g., Mileboard was an integer, SPLC was a string), and semantically (e.g., Mileboards are only meaningful within the context of a single railroad, being the distance from the origin of the line, while SPLCs are universal designators within the context of North America railroads).

Semantic Conflicts

  • Scale Conflicts
    • Same data structure but representing different units. For example, corporate revenue represented as currency, but one using US Dollars and the other using CANADIAN Dollars.
  • Abstraction/Formula Conflicts
    • Same data structure and “symbol”, but two different formulas used to calculate values.
  • Domain Conflicts
    • Similar symbols and data structure, but two different sets of valid values or ranges of values.
    • For example, references to Customers in two systems each have assigned numeric identifiers, but the same customer has different assigned identifiers in each system.

Data Integration

The data integration specification documents how the symbols in two (or more) systems are similar and how they are different. The specification describes how the conflicts identified (under the rough categories described above) can be resolved to produce and combine comparable data symbols from each system. From a practical point of view, researching and documenting/describing the conflicts and similarities between symbols in two different systems is the same activity as defining the data integration specification which would be used to automate the integration.

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