Q&A: Meaning Symbol Sign and Mind (Part 2)

On one of my recent posts, a commentor named “psycho” asked me some very good questions. I decided I needed to respond in more detail than just a single comment reply. I respond in pieces below, so just for context, here is psycho’s entire original comment.

But if you take more meanings, and put them together to get yet another meaning. Don’t you feel like those meanings were again like symbols creating a new meaning?

In my understanding, every bit of information is a symbol – what is represented by the invididual neurons in the brain. And if you take all related bits (that is neurons, symbols), and look at it as a whole, what you get is meaning.

The sentence is a symbol, and it is made of word-symbols. And the list of word-symbols makes a meaning. Which, when given a name (or feeling), becomes a symbol, that can be further involved in other meanings.

I’ll respond to each paragraph in separate posts, in order to get all of my thoughts down in a reasonably readable fashion. Part one covered the first paragraph. Here is part two where I cover the rest of my thoughts.

Symbols in the Mind

In my understanding, every bit of information is a symbol – what is represented by the invididual neurons in the brain. And if you take all related bits (that is neurons, symbols), and look at it as a whole, what you get is meaning.

I’m not a neurologist or any kind of brain scientist by any means, so I could eventually be proven wrong on this, but what a neuron represents, to me is not a symbol and not a sign and not a specific meaning. I know I read somewhere of a brain experiment (using MRIs I think) where the image of Jennifer Aniston presented visually during a brain scan caused only a single neuron to fire. I recall that the interpretation given was that the entire concept of “Jennifer Aniston” was stored in one singular neuron.

I guess I just don’t buy it. What if the meaning of that neuron was more along the lines of “a famous person whose name I forget” or “I recognize a face I’ve seen on ‘Entertainment Tonight'”? The fact of it is, the experimenters drew a conclusion on a correlation that not even their subject would be able to explain or confirm.

Then there is some hypothesis that memories and meanings are distributed across the brain in such a pattern as to suggest more of a holographic storage mechanism (where damage in one area of the brain is overcome by stimulation and growth and retraining).

I think that memory and meaning is essentially an EXPERIENCED thing. That the physical stimuli produce a complex of sensations through re-activation of neurons that causes the brain itself to “sense” the memory. I don’t think this qualifies as a symbollic sensation, being a much more holistic, “analog” experience not unlike the original. If every bit of information were a symbol, then I think we’d be just as hard-wired as computers to recognize only one set of sensations and meanings. Our experience being more fluid, it allows us to be much more creative in the aspects and portions of sensation that we recognize and name. As an individual I have full freedom to separate the signal from the noise, the foreground from the background, as I fancy. I can “slice and dice” me experience of sensation in anyway that I find meaningful, and if I communicate it to you, then you can see what I see just like that. In other words, working with the “analog” of my sensations is a much more powerful, creative endeavor than merely encoding and decoding “digital” symbols.

That’s my two cents on that thought.

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