Software Applications As Perception

“The agent has a scheme of individuation whereby it carves the world up into manageable pieces.”                    K. Devlin, “Situation Theory and Situation Semantics”, whitepaper, 2004, Stanford University.

A software application creates and stores repeated examples of symbols defined within the context of a particular human endeavor, representing a perceived conceptual reality, and encoded into signs using electro-magnetic syntactic media. While the software may be linked through automated sensors to an external environment, it is dependent on human perception and translation to capture and create these symbols. Business applications are almost entirely dependent on human perception to recognize events and observations. That said, while the original “perceptions” are made by human agents, the software, by virtue of the automation of the capture of these perceptions, can be said to “perceive” such events (although this should be considered a metaphor).

Application design is in large part the crystallization of a particular set of perceptions of the world for purposes of providing a regular, repeatable mechanism to record a set of like events and occurrences (data). In essence, the things important to be perceived (concepts) either for their regularity or their utility by some human endeavor (context) will determine the data structures (signs) that will be established, and therefore the data (symbols) that can be recorded by the software system.

The aspects important to the recognition and/or use of these repeated events (e.g., the inferences and conclusions to be derived from their occurence) determines the features or qualities and relationships that the application will record.

Good application design anticipates the questions that might be usefully asked about a situation, but it also limits the information to be collected to certain essentials. This is done purposefully because of the fundamental requirement that the attributes collected must be perceived and then encoded into the symbology within the limited power of automated perceptual systems (relative to human perceptual channels).

In other words, because a human is often the PERCEIVER for an application, the application is dependent on the mental and physical activity of the person to capture (encode) the events. In this role, while the human may perceive a wealth of information, the limits of practicality imposed by the human-computer interface (HCI) guarantees that the application will record only a tiny subset of the possible information.

This does not pose any particular problem, per se (except in creating a brittleness in the software in the face of future contextual change), but just illustrates further how the context of the application is more significantly constrained than either the perceived reality or even the boundaries formed from the limits of human discourse of the event. This inequality can be represented by this naive formulation:

Μ(Ac) << Μ(Hc)

The meaning contained in the Application A defined by the context c is much less than the meaning (information) contained in the Human H perception of the context.

It is important also to note that:

Μ(Ac) is a subset of Μ(Hc)

The meaning contained in the Application A is a subset of the meaning contained in the Human H.

No aspect of the application will contain more information than what the human can perceive. This is not to imply that the humans will necessarily be consciously aware of the information within the application. There are whole classes of applications which are intended to collect information otherwise imperceptible to the human directly. In this manner, applications may act as augmentations of human perceptual abilities. But these applications do not of themselves create new conceptions of reality posteriori to their development, but rather are designed explicitly to search for and recognize (perceive) specific events beyond the perception of natural human senses. Even in these situations, the software can only recognize and record symbols representing the subset of possible measurements/features that their human designers have defined for them.

Hence, while software applications may be said to perceive the world, they are limited to the perceptions chosen a priori by their human designers.

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