Good Summary on How Engineers Define Symbols

An interesting summary of how software engineers are constrained to develop data structures based on their locality is presented in a comment by “katelinkins” at this blog discussing a book about how “information is used“. I think, however, it ends on a note that suggests a bit of wishful thinking, in suggesting that engineers don’t really

…KNOW and UNDERSTAND the code…

and implying that additional effort  by them will permit

validating the representations upfront to aid in development of common taxonomy and shared context

I wasn’t sure whether the comment was suggesting that only software engineers “continually fall short” in this effort, or if she was suggesting a greater human failing.

While software developers can be an arrogant lot (I saw a description of “information arrogance” earlier in this discussion stream, and we can definitely fall into those traps, as anyone else can too), it is not always arrogance that causes our designs not to fit exactly everyone’s expectations.

Software developers do define symbols based on their regional context. But it gets even more constrained than that, because they must define the “symbology” based on what they know at a particular point in time and from a very small circle of sources, even if the software is intended for broad usage.

The fundamental problem is that there is ALWAYS another point of view. The thing that I find endlessly fascinating, actually, is that even though a piece of software was written for one particular business context (no matter how broad or constrained that is), someday, somewhere, a different group of users will figure out how to use the system in an entirely different context.

So, for example, the software application written for the US market that gets sold overseas and is used productively anyway, if not completely or in the same fashion, is a tremendous success, in my mind. This is how such applications as SAP (the product of German software development) has had such great success (if not such great love) worldwide!

I don’t believe there is such thing as a “universal ontology” for any subject matter. In this I think I’m in agreement with some of the other posts on this discussion thread, since the same problem arises in organizing library indexes for various types of the “information seeker” in any search. While having different sets of symbols and conceptions  among a diverse set of communicating humans can muddy the  space of our discourse, we at least have a capacity to compartmentalize these divergent views and switch between them at will. We can even become expert at switching contexts and mediating between people from different contexts.

One of the big problems with software is that it has to take what can be a set of fuzzy ideas, formalize them into a cohesive pattern of structure and logic that satisfies a certain level of rigor, and then “fix in cement” these ideas in the form of bug-free code. The end result is software that had to choose between variations and nuance which the original conceptions may not have ever tried to resolve. Software generally won’t work at all, at least in the most interesting parts of an ontology, if there is a divergence of conception within the body of intended users.

So in order to build anything at all, the developer is forced to close the discussion at some point and try their best to get as much right as is useful, even while they recognize there are variations left unhandled. Even in a mature system, where many of these semantic kinks have been worked out through ongoing negotiations with a particular user community, the software can never be flexible enough to accomodate all manner of semantic variation which presents itself over time without being revised or rewritten.

In the software development space, this fundamental tension between getting some part of the ontology working and getting all points of view universally right in a timely fashion has been one of the driving forces behind all sorts of paradigm shifts in best practices and architectures.  Until the computer software can have its own conversation with a human and negotiate its own design, I don’t see how this fundamental condition will change.

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One Response

  1. […] problem is, that whatever symbols we make in the computer, the computer can only hold structure. Our programs are only manipulating […]

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